Van der Waals heterostructure under rotation at 40 mK

Understanding the mechanism of high temperature (high Tc) superconductivity is a central problem in condensed matter physics. Van der Waals heterostructures provide new tunable materials as model systems for quantum phenomena. An international collaboration (Berkeley, Stanford, Shanghai, Tsukuba, Seoul) reports signatures of tunable superconductivity in an ABC-trilayer graphene/boron nitride moiré superlattice, detected via a sharp drop in the resistivity and a plateau in the I-V curve below 1 K.
The transport measurements are performed in a dilution cryostat with a base electron temperature of 40 mK achieved through careful filtering. For in-plane measurements, the atto3DR double sample rotator was used, which conveniently allows for using the full field of a single solenoid in an arbitrary orientation. The authors find transitions from the candidate superconductor to Mott insulator and metallic phases, proving that the ABC-trilayer graphene / boron nitride superlattice provides a unique model system to study the triangular Hubbard model and its relation to unconventional superconductivity as well as potentially other completely new electronic states.

This measurement was realized with the atto3DR.

Van der Waals heterostructure under rotation at 40 mK atto3DR
Van der Waals heterostructure under rotation at 40 mK atto3DR
Van der Waals heterostructure under rotation at 40 mK atto3DR

Magnetoresistance of self assembled GaMnAs based nanowires using the atto3DR made with atto3DR

Magnetoresistance of self-assembled GaMnAs based nanowires using the atto3DR

The relatively new class of self-assembled ferromagnetic nano­wires could potentially be used for producing e.g. one-dimen­sional spin valve transistors or ferromagnetic single electron transistors, while maintaining a high flexibility in the choice of material as well as the axial and radial degrees of freedom. Due to the arbitrary orientation inherent to self-assembled materials on the substrate, typical characterization tech­niques such as magnetoresistance measurements conducted at cryogenic temperatures greatly benefit from the possibility to freely change the mutual orientation of external magnetic field and sample. To avoide an expensive 3D vector magnet the atto3DR, a 3-dimensional rotator offers a good a reliable solution for transport measurements which is in particular interesting in the field of mesoscopic physics at cryogenics.

This measurement was realized with the atto3DR, and the atto3DR.


Performance Characterization of a Cryogenic Probe Station attoCPS I made with the cryogenig probe station

Performance Characterization of a Cryogenic Probe Station attoCPS I

In a series of tests with the attocube systems probestation, Munich researchers have found significant benefits for their research of nano-electro-mechanical structures and related high frequency experiments. In the basic version, the cryogenic probe station consists of four 3-axes positioning stacks (ANPxyz50/LT) allowing to position four probes independently onto a sample with high precision (max. sample diameter: 6 mm).

This measurement was realized with the Cryogenic Probe Station.


Ferroelectric Domain at Cryogenic Phase Transitions

Ferroelectric barium titanate (BTO) exhibits several ferroelectric phase transitions at cryogenic temperatures, resulting in severe structural changes and domain formation. Using an Attocube AFM I, the group of Prof. Eng (Institute of Applied Physics, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden, Germany) has investigated this domain dynamics in BTO single crystals applying both piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) down to 10 K. The two images display the PFM signal (a) and surface potential measured by KPFM (b) in contact and non-contact mode, respectively, over the same 15 µm x 15 µm sample area at T = 220 K (orthorhombic BTO phase).

This measurement was realized with the attoAFM I.

Ferroelectric Domain at Cryogenic Phase Transitions atomic force microscope attoAFM
Ferroelectric Domain at Cryogenic Phase Transitions atomic force microscope attoAFM

Mechanically Controlled Multi Contact Break Junctions made with Low Temperature Nanopositioners

Mechanically Controlled Multi-Contact Break Junctions

In this application, small tips made from either glass or graphite were used to locally deform a silicon membrane, creating break junctions in a very controlled fashion. The tips with a typical radius between 50 and 200 microns were precisely controlled using attocube’s nanopositioning technology. The approach of locally creating and controlling individual break junctions can be used to study the influence of optical excitations on the conductance of individual molecules and for controllable metallic single-electron transistors.

This measurement was realized with the ANPx51/LT - linear x-nanopositioner.


Mapping and Manipulation of Leakage Currents in a Nanostructure made with cryogenic nanopositioners

Mapping and Manipulation of Leakage Currents in a Nanostructure

In this application note, attocube’s smallest titanium positioners (ANPx51/RES and ANPz51/RES) are used as part of an atomic force microscope (AFM) inside a Janis ³He cryostat with a base tempera­ture of 280 mK. The setup is a combined low tem­perature AFM and scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which is emploied to carry out scanning gate microscopy experiments on various nanostructures. In these measurements the positioners are used to move the metallic tip directly above the nanostructure predominantly at 4.2 K but also as low as 280 mK.


In situ Measurements of Irradiation Induced Creep on Amorphous Micropillars made with Ambient or Vacuum Nanopositioner and IDS3010

In situ Measurements of Irradiation-Induced Creep on Amorphous Micropillars

S. Özerinç and his colleagues at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed an apparatus for measuring irradiation induced damage and stress on the nanometer scale. Using attocube's ECS3030 as well as the FPS3010 interferometer, the system can measure in situ the deformation of mechanically stressed micro-pillars, during which the pillars are irradiated with heavy MeV ions. The apparatus provides a new and effective approach to accelerate the evaluation of promising materials for future nuclear power plant applications.

This measurement was realized with the ANPx101/RT - linear x-nanopositioner, and the Displacement Measuring Interferometer.


Angle dependent transport measurements at 40 mK made with cryogenic positioners

Angle-dependent transport measurements at 40 mK

Based on an attocube systems rotator ANR30/LT a rotation stage for angle-dependent transport measurements in magnetic fields up to 33 T and temperatures down to 40 mK was built at the user facility of the High Field Magnet Laboratory in Nijme­gen.
The mixing chamber of the commercially available dilution refrigerator from Leiden Cryogenics offers only a limited space of 17 mm in diameter. Hence, the ultra compact attocube rotator ANR30/LT is the positioner of choice for this task. The rotator is fixed on a plastic (Hysol) dilution refrigerator insert.

This measurement was realized with the ANR31/LT rotator made from Titanium and CuBe.


Differential conductance measurements on Pd break junctions measured using an attoCPS I made with the cryogenig probe station

Differential conductance measurements on Pd break-junctions measured using an attoCPS I

In this application, an attocube 4-point probe station is used to perform tunneling spectroscopy measurements in metallic nanogap devices at cryogenic temperatures. A single nanowire is contacted by two probes and a thermally-assisted electromigration process is employed to create a sub-nanometer tunneling gap.
Nanopositioners independently move each DC probe along the x, y, and z directions, enabling electrical contact to each device in succession. The contacting process is monitored by an inspection optics that provides good optical resolution to securely contact the pads of about 50 - 100 µm in size.

This measurement was realized with the Cryogenic Probe Station.


Low temperature magnetization reversal properties of SrRuO3 made with the low temperature atomic force microscope

Low temperature magnetization reversal properties of SrRuO3

Understanding the dynamics of magnetization reversal in materials is key to assessing their potential for magnetic storage. Most studies so far have concentrated on room temperature experiments. However, this only represents a narrow range of relevant parameters. L. Landau and co-workers from the group of Lior Klein (Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel) explored the other end of the parameter range. Using the attoAFM I they studied the low temperature magnetization reversal properties of SrRuO3.

This measurement was realized with the attoAFM I.


Enhancing Quantum Dot Emitters by Precisely Positioned Micrometric SILs

Using interferometric closed loop scanning integrated into the attoCFM I confocal microscope for cryogenic in-situ lithography, the group of P. Michler in Stuttgart was able to optically localize quantum dots (QDs) with a unprecedented precision of 2 nm and mark them via lithography.
This procedure enables further processing and optimizing these single photon emitters to enhance light extraction. In this case, they successfully demonstrated how to precisely add hemispherical lenses directly on top of the quantum dot via 3D direct laser writing. This led to an enhancement in extraction efficiency by a factor of 2.

“Our attoCFM I LT-lithography setup is not only the best choice when it comes to stability requirements. Its closed loop scanning feature also allows us to optically pre-select quantum dots suitable for desired experiments and mark them in-situ via lithography with nanometric precision.”
Prof. Dr. Peter Michler (University of Stuttgart, Germany)

This measurement was realized with the attoCFM I, and the Low Temperature Photolithography.

Enhancing Quantum Dot Emitters by Precisely Positioned Micrometric SILs attoCFM I  closed loop scanning  cryogenic photolithography
Enhancing Quantum Dot Emitters by Precisely Positioned Micrometric SILs attoCFM I  closed loop scanning  cryogenic photolithography

Rotating transport measurement setup at 25mK cryogenic positioner  ANR101 LT RES BeCu

Rotating transport measurement setup at 25mK

When designing a setup for mK applications material choice and thermalization is crucial. At Peking University (Beijing, China), Dr. Pengjie Wang from Xi Lin group has chosen the beryllium-copper version of the ANR101 positioner with resistive readout to realize their low-electron-temperature sample rotation system for transport measurements inside a dilution cryostat. The rotator allows to orient the sample in-situ with respect to a high magnetic field of up to 10 T. The measured electron temperature in the setup is 25 mK, the same as the environmental temperature.

(Figure reproduced from Rev. Sci. Instrum. 90, 023905 (2019); doi: 10.1063/1.5083994, with the permission of AIP Publishing)

This measurement was realized with the ANR101/RES/LT - rotator (360° endless).